Ideation and intention to use contraceptives in Kenya and Nigeria

‘In countries with low contraceptive prevalence, programs should seek to identify ways to correct prevailing myths and rumors, increase contraceptive awareness, and promote positive social interactions around contraceptive use.’ This is one of the main conclusions of a new paper in Demographic Research. Below is the citation, abstract, and URL to full text (free).

I would be interested to learn more about myths and rumours, and whether/how these can be addressed in different contexts. Beliefs identified in this paper include:

– use of contraceptive injection can make a woman sterile

– people who use contraception end up with health problems 0.688 0.701

– contraceptives can harm your womb

– contraceptives reduce women’s sexual urge

– contraceptives can cause cancer

– contraceptives can give you deformed babies

– contraceptives are dangerous to your health

– women who use FP may become promiscuous.

CITATION: Ideation and intention to use contraceptives in Kenya and Nigeria

Stella Babalola, Neetu John, Bolanle Ajao, Ilene S. Speizer.

Demographic Research: Volume 33, Article 8

Corresponding author: sbabalol@jhusph.edu

http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol33/8/33-8.pdf

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Contraceptive use remains low to moderate in most African countries. Ideation, or the ideas and views that people hold, has been advanced as a possible explanation for differences in contraceptive use within and across countries.

OBJECTIVES: In this paper, we sought to identify the relevant dimensions of ideation and assess how these dimensions relate to contraceptive use intentions in two illustrative countries, Kenya and Nigeria.

METHODS: Using factor analysis, we first identified the relevant dimensions of ideation from a set of cognitive, emotional, and social interaction items. Subsequently, we examined the relationships of these dimensions with intention to use contraceptives.

RESULTS: The data revealed four dimensions of contraceptive ideation in both countries: perceived self-efficacy, myths and rumors related to contraceptives, social interactions and influence, and contraceptive awareness. All four dimensions of ideation are strongly associated with contraceptive use intention in Nigeria. Only perceived self-efficacy [confidence in one’s ability to act] was significantly associated with contraceptive use intention in Kenya.

CONCLUSION: The ideation model is relevant for contraceptive use research and programing. Programs seeking to increase contraceptive use and help women to attain their desired family size should prioritize promotion of contraceptive self-efficacy. In addition, in countries with low contraceptive prevalence, programs should seek to identify ways to correct prevailing myths and rumors, increase contraceptive awareness, and promote positive social interactions around contraceptive use.

Let’s build a future where people are no longer dying for lack of healthcare knowledge – Join HIFA: www.hifa2015.org  

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