#WoncaAfrica 11 September 2017

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WONCA E-Update Friday 8th September 2017

WONCA E-Update
Friday 8th September 2017

WONCA News – September 2017
The latest WONCA News (September 2017) is accessible via the WONCA website, with lots of WONCA news, views and events.

From the President 
Networks, opportunities and prioritisation – does enthusiasm need to be balanced with realism? The President has been in Tanzania at both the Aga Khan University and meeting with the International Federation of Medical Student Associations and has many more international trips throughout the rest of the year. In this month’s column Professor Amanda Howe reflects on what added value a visit from the WONCA President adds to events globally.

SIG on Cancer and Palliative Care
WONCA is blessed with 13 Special Interest Groups, and in the coming weeks we’ll be highlighting the activities of several of them. This week we begin by promoting the activities of the SIG on Cancer and Palliative Care. Dr Annette Berendsen, Convenor of the SIG, provides some details in her report on activities in 2016-17, which you can read here: http://www.globalfamilydoctor.com/News/SIGonCancerandPalliativeCareAnnualReport.aspx

Dr Artenca Collaku – WONCA Featured Doctor
One of this month’s featured doctors is Dr Artenca Collaku of Albania. She works as a family doctor in Health Centre No4 in Tirana, serving a population of around 60,000. During her time as Director of the Centre she got it formally accredited – the first centre accredited in Albania. Together with some other family doctors they founded the Albanian Academy of Family Doctor three years ago and are working to enhance the role and importance of family doctors, through education and scientific activities. You can read more about life as an Albanian family doctor here:
http://www.globalfamilydoctor.com/member/WoncaPeople/COLLAKUDrArtenca.aspx

Super Early bird registration for WONCA Rural 2018: New Delhi – DEADLINE EXTENDED
The 15th WONCA World Rural Health Conference will take place in New Delhi from 26th to 29th April 2018. The organizers have advised us that the deadline for super-early bird registration has now been extended until 15th September, so there is still time to take advantage of the very special delegate rates.

Want to know how good your doctor is?

If patients had better information about private health providers, this would stimulate competition, says the Health Market Inquiry. Patients should be able to compare the performance of private hospitals and doctors before making their choice, according to the Competition Commission’s Health Market Inquiry (HMI)
The HMI proposed this week that an independent organisation, the Outcomes Measurement and Reporting Organisation (OMRO), be set up to report on the health outcomes of private healthcare providers. It defines outcomes as “the results achieved for a patient after a given set of interventions”.
For much of last year, the HMI held public hearings into the private healthcare sector. One of its finding is that the public lacks information about how private health providers perform. It believes that public access to this information would stimulate competition. The kind of information they want us to have include clinical outcomes (eg cure rates), how long it takes for patients to get treated at facilities, the infection rate in facilities and the rate of “avoidable adverse events”…..more

We don’t want no ‘ethics what-what’

An issue that has lingered in the presidency for the past seven years came to a head in Parliament this week – and, in an ironic move, a former ally of President Jacob Zuma was the one agitating to put the matter to rest.

ANC MPs tried to stonewall an attempt by Parliament’s justice portfolio committee to comply with the remedial actions put forward by former public protector Thuli Madonsela in her State of Capture report.

But in an ironic twist, committee chairperson Mathole Motshekga argued against further delaying the matter. Even the DA was moved to say that, for once, it agreed with the former ANC chief whip. The DA is usually at loggerheads with Motshekga.

It all started back in April 2010, when Madonsela recommended that Parliament amend the Executive Members’ Ethics Act, a law that governs the conduct of Cabinet members, deputy ministers and members of provincial executive councils….more

A shift in thinking is needed to counter South Africa’s startling rise in poverty

South Africa urgently needs new policy ideas to reverse the alarming increase in poverty among its population. New figures reveal an increase of three million South Africans living in poverty over the last five years. More than half (55%) of the population lives on less than R1,138 (USD$107) a month, up from 53% in 2011.

In a country with 55 million people, 34 million are going without some of the basic necessities, like housing, transport, food, heating and proper clothing. The escalation in hardship and vulnerability reverses the steady progress made since the 1990s.

The poorest have been hit the hardest. One in four citizens survives on less than R531 a month and can’t afford to buy enough food to keep healthy. This proportion has risen from one in five in 2011.

The consequences are plain to see. They include more street begging, homelessness, loan sharks, social discontent, substance misuse and violent crime in many communities. Income is not the only measure of poverty. Progress on education, health and basic living conditions also seems to have stalled….more

Cosatu opposition to private healthcare ‘will scupper NHI’

Cosatu’s opposition to the private sector having a role in the implementation of National Health Insurance (NHI) could fundamentally scupper the achievement of universal healthcare coverage in SA. says the Board of Healthcare Funders.

Dr Clarence Mini of the Board of Healthcare Funders of Southern Africa says that the private sector supports the government’s calls for universal healthcare for all South Africans, and has a wealth of expertise, processes and systems that can give the implementation of NHI in South Africa a major boost.

“By far the most compelling reason is that the private sector comprising of medical schemes, administrators, hospitals and medical professionals have the resources that can contribute positively to the improvement of South African healthcare in general and to the improvement of healthcare provisioning in specific communities. It is able to share its skills, experiences, research and resources more meaningfully towards the achievement of affordable, equitable and quality healthcare. Medical schemes and administrators already look after 16% of South Africans and these skills will be of enormous benefit in the public sector which simply does not have this capacity yet. The responsibility of the Minister encompasses the entire healthcare value chain across public and private entities and how these are brought together to ensure the viability and security of quality healthcare provisioning in South Africa,” says Mini…..more

Barriers in Case Managers’ Roles: A Qualitative Systematic Review.

Abstract

The challenges faced by case managers when implementing case management have received little focus. Several qualitative studies have been published that may be able to shed light on those challenges. This study is a systematic review of qualitative literature to identify barriers case managers have when implementing case management. Five electronic bibliographic databases were systematically searched, and 10 qualitative studies were identified for inclusion in the review which were published from 2007 to 2016. Through thematic synthesis of findings, five themes were identified as barriers to case management implementation: unclear scope of practice, diverse and complex case management activities, insufficient training, poor collaboration with other health-care providers, and client relationship challenges. This review study suggested that standardized evidence-based practical protocols and certification programs may help overcome case managers’ barriers and improve case management practices. Health policymakers, case management associations, and health-care management researchers should develop educational and practical supports for case managers.

WONCA News September 2017

Wonca | Global Family Doctor Newsletter

WONCA News September 2017

WONCA has just held two highly successful conferences: one in Pretoria, South Africa; and the other in Lima, Peru. There are still Kathmandu and Pattaya to come in 2017, and a number of events already scheduled in 2018. See all WONCA conferences here.

This month we feature the annual reports of some of the WONCA Special Interest Groups (SIGs). Our two featured doctors are young women who are leaders in family medicine in their countries: Victoria Tkachenko from Ukraine and Artenca Collaku from Albania. And our Rural Round up is written by a medical student from the USA, Jesse Rockmore.

I recommend considering Jan de Maeseneer’s new book to celebrate his retirement – the foreward was written by four WONCA World Presidents.
Dr Karen Flegg. WONCA Editor

Featured Stories

From the President: September 2017

Networks, opportunities and prioritisation – does enthusiasm need to be balanced with realism? – The President has been in Tanzania at both the Aga Khan University and meeting with the International Federation of Medical Student Associations.

From the CEO’s desk: Peru 2017, Dubai 2020 and more conferences

It’s been a busy month for travel, with trips to Dubai and Peru for the WONCA CEO. He has attended the WONCA Iberoamericana conference in Peru recently and been planning for our world conference coming to Abu Dhabi in 2020.

Policy Bite. PHC funding a percent of total health care spending

This month’s guest policy bite comes from the American Board of Family Medicine and the Robert Graham Center, in the USA. It discusses the paper “Primary Health Care as a Foundation for Strengthening Health Systems in Low- and Middle-Income Countries”

Rural round up: Jesse Rockmore, medical student, writes

I am Jesse Rockmore, a 4th year osteopathic medical student in the United States. I am originally from a small town in the lower Appalachian Mountains in Georgia. Poor access to primary and surgical care in my small town compelled me to pursue a career in rural health care.

Jan De Maeseneer publishes “Family Medicine and Primary Care at the Crossroads of Societal Change” on the occasion of his academic retirement.

Well known colleague and Family Medicine leader, Prof Jan De Maeseneer has written a book, “Family Medicine and Primary Care at the Crossroads of Societal Change”. The WONCA Editor interviews Jan about this publication.

WONCA Iberoamericana region- CIMF ? Manifesto against violence and intolerance

The board of WONCA Iberoamericana region-CIMF release their Manifesto against violence and intolerance developed during the recent regional conference in Lima, Peru. Available in English Spanish and Portuguese.

 

 

Español

De la Presidenta :
septiembre 2017

Manifiesto en contra de la violencia y la intolerencia

français

De la Présidente :
septembre 2017

WONCA SIG Annual Reports

Migrant Care, International Health & Travel Medicine

Conflict and Catastrophe Medicine

Cancer and Palliative Care

Emergency Medicine

Resources

Goodfellow GEMS

Featured Doctors

Dr Artenca COLLAKU
Albania

A/Prof Victoria TKACHENKO
Ukraine

Dr Shigeaki HINOHARA
1911-2017

CONFERENCES

Wonca Web Forum

What if our care were designed by patients?

“I want to ask ourselves to imagine, what would it be like if our care were designed by patients? And if our leaders were selected by patients? And if our organizations were designed by patients?”

Swensen relates the story of a friend of his, who co-owns a twin-engine Aerostar plane, noting that this story helps keep him grounded on patient centeredness. Every time maintenance work is done on the plane, guess who is the first person to fly it? The mechanic. We can compare the mechanic’s perception of the work at hand and the responsibility to that of being a patient. “If we continually prompt ourselves to think about our care, our systems, our compensation systems, our leader selection process through the eyes of a mechanic who is about to fly in a plane that s/he is repairing, it changes the game.”……more

The Critical Window of Medical School: Learning to See People Before the Disease

cute-kittens-2560x1440-adorable-hd-5655Imagine two identical groups of kittens. We’ll call them vertical kittens and horizontal kittens because of how they are to be raised. The vertical kittens are raised in a world that only contains vertical lines. Their cages are lined with vertically striped wallpaper; even the people who feed them wear shirts with vertical stripes. The horizontal kittens are only ever exposed to horizontal lines. Horizontal lines are all they see. You may by now recognize this story as one of the foundational experiments in neurobiology, but let’s go back to the cats.

After a predetermined period of time, the horizontal kittens are presented with a chair. They see the seat, and jump to sit. No problem. But they repeatedly walk into the legs. They simply don’t see them. The vertical kittens are presented with the same chair. They can’t find a place to sit — they are blind to the horizontal seat — but will happily weave in between the vertical legs…..more

Why Emotional Intelligence Is Important for Leadership: be aware of self and others and learn how to manage self and others

How salaries are eating into provincial public health budgets

South African Health Review says poor-quality primary healthcare services and a growing burden of noncommunicable diseases cripple the system.  Public health expenditure has ballooned to R183bn over the past 20 years, but a large chunk of provincial health budgets is spent on salaries, a review released on Tuesday shows. Simultaneously, poor-quality primary healthcare services and a growing burden of noncommunicable diseases crippled the system, said the South African Health Review.

The report by public health organisation Health Systems Trust analyses health sector challenges, reform initiatives and their implications for transformation of public healthcare. Managing editor of the South African Health Review Ashnie Padarath said the review had identified areas where sustained and concerted action was required. “It paints a mixed picture and shows evidence of progress in many of the programmes that are needed to ensure the successful implementation of NHI [National Health Insurance].” ….more

SAHR 2017 Web version

THABO MBEKI: The ANC’s insistence that MPs serve the party is a betrayal of the revolution and the Constitution

On August 8 2017 our National Assembly convened to consider and vote on a motion of no confidence in the president of the republic, the honourable Jacob Zuma. Following a judgment which had been handed down by our Constitutional Court, the speaker of the National Assembly, honourable Baleka Mbete, had prescribed that the members of the National Assembly, our MPs, would respond to the motion through a secret ballot.

It is a matter of public record that this no confidence motion failed. This was because the majority of the members of the National Assembly, our MPs, voting in a secret ballot, effectively confirmed their confidence in the president of our republic. The process in which the National Assembly engaged, resulting in this outcome, represented an admirable manifestation of the health of our democracy. ….more

How the NHI will affect SA’s middle class — and add to the burden on the public health system

Government’s plan to ditch medical aid tax credits is expected to force nearly 2-million people into the already overcrowded state health system. If the tax credit is removed‚ 20% of medical aid users will no longer be able to afford it‚ a leading economics consultancy warned in a study published on Friday.

It would mean 1.9-million of the 8-million medical aid members‚ including children‚ will drop out of the private healthcare system. This is according to an analysis by Econex‚ a Stellenbosch-based economics consultancy. When the new National Health Insurance policy document was released in July by Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi‚ he said he wanted to remove the tax credit to users‚ which amounts to R20bn…..more

WONCA E-Update Friday 25th August 2017

WONCA E-Update
Friday 25th August 2017

WONCA News – August 2017
The latest WONCA News (August 2017) is accessible via the WONCA website, with lots of WONCA news, views and events.

Policy Bite: Getting the Evidence for the Impact of Family Medicine
Last month’s policy bite addressed the value of describing what is happening in different countries, and the launch of a new website which would allow WONCA members to share their country’s data. A different kind of evidence is needed to evaluate the impact of new inputs through primary health care and – in our specific area of interest – family doctors. In this month’s Policy Bite, Professors Felicity Goodyear Smith and Amanda Howe invite WONCA readers to let them know of any research going on globally looking at various aspects of health systems.

We are putting out a ‘call for evidence’. We are keen to know if anyone is working on studies that explicitly evaluate the role of family doctors within a service. If you are due to publish in the near future, please share your early findings with WONCA leads for your country / regional / globally, so that we can ensure we have the most up to date evidence available. And if you are not a researcher, then please help your academic colleagues as best you can – by collating data, or letting them know of new opportunities to evaluate service developments that involve family doctors. 

Another busy and fruitful year @RuralWONCA
Every year the WONCA Working Party on Rural Practice produces an annual report for WONCA Executive and this year decided that it would be useful to share some of the topics in Rural Roundup. It’s been a particularly busy year for the WP, with two conferences within six months; at the World WONCA Conference in Rio de Janeiro (November 2016) and at their own 14th WONCA World Rural Health Conference in Cairns Australia (April 2017). Catch up with this very active Working Party at: http://www.globalfamilydoctor.com/News/AnotherbusyandfruitfulyearRuralWONCA.aspx

Promoting Planetary Health
The WONCA Europe 2017 conference seemed a very favorable setting to promote the issue of Planetary Health and increase the general awareness for it. Some of this happened, but the potential is much greater, as well as its appropriate place to be mentioned to a wider audience, such as any medical conference (especially by primary care physicians) as an issue which should require everybody’s attention.

Ralph Guggenheim, from WONCA’s Working Party on the Environment, posted his reflections on Planetary Health to the group’s discussion forum. You can read it here, together with the WONCA Statement on Planetary Health and Sustainable Development Goals.

Featured Doctor: Professor Zalika Klemenc Ketis

One of this month’s Featured Doctors is Professor Zalika Klemenc Ketis, who is a member of the WONCA Europe Executive Board, representing EQuiP. At the Faculty of Medicine, University of Maribor, she is the chair of the Department of Family Medicine and associate professor of family medicine as well as head of the research group. She is also partly employed in the largest healthcare centre in Slovenia – Ljubljana Community Health Care Centre, where she works in family medicine practice – and at the Institute for the research and development of primary healthcare.

WHO On-line Courses on epidemics, pandemics and health emergencies
WHO has launched a series of video courses on epidemics, pandemics and health emergencies. Geared for those working in emergencies, the courses are also accessible to the public. The courses – which are on a platform called OpenWHO –   transform complex scientific knowledge into easy-to-understand introductory video lessons, using a smaller bandwidth so that people in any country can access them. Offline versions are available on both IOS and Android devices. The platform can host an unlimited number of users and is free and open to anyone wishing to register.

Public-private partnerships provide evidence for value of co-operation

Budget reviews are generally good platforms from which to announce plans to boost economic growth, create jobs and alleviate poverty. They are also good mines of information and are often read over and over again to get those important bits the finance minister did not mention directly in his speech before Parliament.

The Budget Review for 2017-18 is no exception. Tucked away, almost at the back of this lengthy document, is an update on public-private partnership (PPP) arrangements and the role they have played in meeting infrastructural development objectives. It remains compelling evidence for what the government and the private sector can accomplish together. ….more

Public-private partnerships provide evidence for value of co-operation

Budget reviews are generally good platforms from which to announce plans to boost economic growth, create jobs and alleviate poverty. They are also good mines of information and are often read over and over again to get those important bits the finance minister did not mention directly in his speech before Parliament.

The Budget Review for 2017-18 is no exception. Tucked away, almost at the back of this lengthy document, is an update on public-private partnership (PPP) arrangements and the role they have played in meeting infrastructural development objectives. It remains compelling evidence for what the government and the private sector can accomplish together. ….more